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I can’t answer your question, as I’ve only done 9k in my Soul and 9 months - others will be along with more info I am sure - but anecdotally I haven’t heard of ANY battery degradation on ANY 64KWh Kia

Certainly on mine the SOH is exactly as it was on day 1
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tip. If anyone else wants to watch it the link is here
Very interesting that he says he replaces the tyres with an A rated tyre (which is lowest rolling resistance). If I understand correctly the tyres originally supplied were C rated. Although he talks about state of charge of the battery, he seems to mean "state of health" which you can see from the dealer diagnostic print out which he shows. Even more impressive as he says he fast charges the car most days.
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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The problem is that the 100% SOH is that reported by the cars own BMS system generated figure. You can view this figure with an OBD scanner. Nobody (except Hyundai/Kia) knows how this figure is actually arrived at. It appears from all reports I’ve seen that it never ever reports anything less than 100%. So I’m not sure it really means anything useful in reality. I cannot believe that after Cabbie007 extreme usage there isn’t any measurable battery degradation whatsoever. Surely there must be some, but the BMS just isn’t showing it. Peter.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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The problem is that the 100% SOH is that reported by the cars own BMS system generated figure. You can view this figure with an OBD scanner. Nobody (except Hyundai/Kia) knows how this figure is actually arrived at. It appears from all reports I’ve seen that it never ever reports anything less than 100%. So I’m not sure it really means anything useful in reality. I cannot believe that after Cabbie007 extreme usage there isn’t any measurable battery degradation whatsoever. Surely there must be some, but the BMS just isn’t showing it. Peter.
Honda did the same thing with the Insight & CRZ hybrids when customers started demanding a new battery because the SOC gauge showed the true SOC, which of course dropped year on year.

Their answer was to issue a BMS update so that the gauge always shows 100%, but this is 100% of the actual remaining capacity (SOH), which on my 7year old CRZ was about 56%. The useable range is a better measure.
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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We should ask Bjorn to perform one of his famous degradation tests. Last one I saw was a M3 LR that after 88k kilometers had around 8% degradation. I think Tesla don't apply buffers to their batteries so with the e-Niro that number would likely be lower.

In the end though it's all a bit theoretical. If the cab driver does not notice any range loss in his day to day driving, then who cares if degradation is 0% or 5%. It only really becomes important if your trips regularly hit the limit of the battery's capacity, which is pretty rare with a 64 kWh battery. And it's the main reason why I went for a car with a bigger battery as well. I doubt I would ever notice even 15% degradation though I guess that's a long way off
 

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Cabbie 007 does not do an actual battery degradation analysis of any kind. I have about 43,000 (69,200 km) miles on mine that I bought in November 2019. I did 252 mile (405 km) trip at just over 40,000 miles (64,373 km) and when I got home I still had 25 miles (40 km) of range left. I know this is nowhere near as good as Bjorn degradation test but it tells me what I want to know which is how far can I still drive it. The car has held up beautifully. The only issue I've had was a loos bolt on the spoiler that caused a slight rattle. It took me less than 2 minutes to tighten the bolt myself. Definitely glad I bought this over a Tesla. Far less quality issues, I like having all of the buttons, the space is perfect for me and way less money to purchase and to own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the reply that's great to hear. I bought mine for exactly the same reasons. The great thing is the Kia actually does the advertised range (and a bit more if you're careful). Two friends with long-range Tesla model 3 report that fully charged they are only showing 310 miles or so.
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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View attachment 147542

Not my car en not in miles but still a achievement.
SOH was still 100%
That’s an amazing mileage for any car but especially for an EV at nearly 100,000! I mean how long has Eniro been available? It must have spent half its entire life driving and the other half charging :ROFLMAO:. It’s good to see anyway. Peter.
 

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View attachment 147542

Not my car en not in miles but still a achievement.
SOH was still 100%
That is an achievement. Do you know your total average km per kwh? Mine is about 6.2 km per kwh but I drive a lot at high speeds on interstate highways. I am curious because that number will help to calculate battery degradation and with your car having so many miles on it, it is one of if not the best one to use as a great example.
 

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Cabbie 007 does not do an actual battery degradation analysis of any kind. I have about 43,000 (69,200 km) miles on mine that I bought in November 2019. I did 252 mile (405 km) trip at just over 40,000 miles (64,373 km) and when I got home I still had 25 miles (40 km) of range left. I know this is nowhere near as good as Bjorn degradation test but it tells me what I want to know which is how far can I still drive it. The car has held up beautifully. The only issue I've had was a loos bolt on the spoiler that caused a slight rattle. It took me less than 2 minutes to tighten the bolt myself. Definitely glad I bought this over a Tesla. Far less quality issues, I like having all of the buttons, the space is perfect for me and way less money to purchase and to own.
We got one of the first e-Niro to come into France, took delivery in March 2019. We have only done 47,000 km so nothing like as busy as yours Rixk. The car is averaging 14.5 kWh/100 km winter/summer. For local driving in summer we see comfortably over 500 km of range. A recent round trip to the Auvergne (900 km) allowed us to do the each way trip on a single charge, mostly on autoroute with the A/C running. Worse case scenario in winter driving into the wind at highway (110 km/h) speeds we are seeing 350 km real world range. In summer at highway speeds comfortably 400-450 km. We typically charge once a week up to 80% and I have never seen less than 11% SOC on the car. We have done some long trips to Switzerland and the UK, never had any rapid charging problems other than the chargers themselves underperforming. Up until recently nothing has ever gone wrong with the car but the passenger side wing mirror will no longer fold on locking. Still waiting for the dealer in Niort to get back to me on that as it is of course a warranty repair. I agree with you on the build quality which seems at least as good as more expensive German brands I have owned in the past. We are retired so this has to be a long termer...I doubt I will ever buy another car but so far no detectable loss of range. I suspect this has a lot to do with the real battery size being 67.5 kWh, so there are spare cells to bring into play as the battery ages. See Kia e-Niro Diaries and Kia e-Niro Diaries Encore which is my YouTube channel for details
 
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