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Hi EV owners.

I have just received a new leaf acenta (2 days ago) and have done my regular commute this morning - to Oxford, mainly motorway/A road.

I took it easy at a steady 70 on the motorway, but found that although the range was 93 at the start, I did about 43 miles with only 25 left in the tank when I got home - where have the other 25 gone?

Will the battery improve over the next few weeks or is it the motorway that is killing the range? I am hoping a run in period will help a bit.

Loving the silence and hoping not to go to petrol station from now on ....
 

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43 miles at 70mph will drain the battery to a greater extent than lower speed.. Over the next few weeks, if you do mixed driving, you should notice an improvement in the average. It also depends on the hills you encounter on the way, how fast you accelerate and so on. The climate control settings and weather also have an influence on range. Give it a while and learn from the good info in this forum about the driving techniques to get the best mileage..
 
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Yes, there are a lot more factors that influence battery range other than charge. There is a lot of drag due to wind resistance at 70mph... so you could have used less energy at 50mph to go the same distance, as @hopbackguy said. Your use of the climate controls will play a big factor. Your diving technique will influence things as will the terrain. So, in essence, "What he said!".
 

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Why would his diving technique have anything to do with his car's battery range @Lee?
 

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70mph is a battery killer. Just dropping to 60-65 will make a surprising difference.
I'd be less concerned about the climate control - using it should only take 1 mile off your range usually.

Some people have raised their tyre pressures slightly - certainly on cold tyres I use more energy than when they are nicely warmed, so it's likely a couple of extra PSI would help (but don't over do it!)
 

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If you drive aggressively and need more braking, that'll give you shorter range than if you manage to slow without braking and driving faster will use more battery than going slow... The way you drive does have an impact on range, not capacity, but range. Feathering the accelerator rather than quick acceleration, lots of factors.
 

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70 mph is only about 65 miles range, 60mph is about 75, but that is 100% to dead, so I would only plan about 55 miles usable at 70mph or 65 miles usable at 60mph.

That's with climate control on since I don't understand why you'd drive without it on.
 

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70 mph is only about 65 miles range, 60mph is about 75, but that is 100% to dead, so I would only plan about 55 miles usable at 70mph or 65 miles usable at 60mph.

That's with climate control on since I don't understand why you'd drive without it on.
Yes, I'd agree with that.
On my first journey, I did Scotch Corner to Woolley Edge, which is about 68 miles.I left Scotch Corner with 90% and arrived at Woolley Edge with 10%. I did 60-65 most of the way, with a bit of lorry slip-streaming to help out.

I 100% agree about climate control. It amazes me that people talk about driving without it - perhaps in a emergency, but not day-to-day. How could you ever convince the world of the viability of EVs if you have to add "of course, you can't use the heater in winter..."?
 

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The Volt's "tips" also indicate that hard accelerations are less-efficient. I can only assume that there is somehow more energy consumed, then, when accelerating hard to, say, 40 mph as compared to when you accelerate slowly to the same speed.
 

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Hi there Oxon EV

Welcome to the group. Congratulations on your new LEAF. What you are seeing is pretty much what I would expect to see - there are a great number of factors that will affect how you drive. Perhaps some of the advice that folks on this group will help out.

Firstly from a fuel economy perspective the thing to keep half an eye on is your average miles/kWh. If you are starting out then you'll likely be in the 3.5 - 3.8 range. That's a great start.

Now, try opening up the big screen on the dash, press the zE button and then economy. This will show you a number of gauges. The leftmost one is going to be most helpful.

When accelerating try to keep below 20 - that's 3 circles on the main dash. When decelerating try not to go into the negative when approaching a junction - the secret here is to freewheel to a halt and DO NOT BRAKE. If you need to slow more rapidly then try to feather the regenerative braking. Be prepared to change down to B-Mode if you need to decelerate more rapidly but BRAKING IS AN ADMISSION OF DEFEAT :)

Try to set the cruise control to 60.

But at the end of the day, the driving's so cheap it really does not matter how much electricity you use, as long as you get to the next convenient charger with some to spare, so for example this evening I drove nicely until the motorway then kept up with the BMWs and Audis as I knew I'd still get home with juice enough.
 

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Thanks everyone. I am getting to grips with it now, and extending the range. It
does require a slightly different driving style, although it is nice to knock of the eco button and burn off on occasion. Lots of good tips, so I'll persevere!
 

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Thanks everyone. I am getting to grips with it now, and extending the range. It
does require a slightly different driving style, although it is nice to knock of the eco button and burn off on occasion. Lots of good tips, so I'll persevere!
In some reviews and comments about EVs in the media I've seen references made to learning the slightly different driving style as if it's a slightly negative thing; As if 'everyone knows how to drive a normal car and they'll have to learn something new'. Nonsense really - it ignores the fact that people learn how to adapt to a diesel vs petrol, and the way to drive an automatic after driving a manual. Fear of the unknown :)
 

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Thanks everyone. I am getting to grips with it now, and extending the range. It
does require a slightly different driving style, although it is nice to knock of the eco button and burn off on occasion. Lots of good tips, so I'll persevere!
Yeah I agree with the comments here, speed is everything and it is non-linear,
power consumption rises with speed cubed. (Roughly if you double your speed power consumption rises 8-fold)
If I am doing a longer journey I rarely go above 60.
Also try not to brake too aggressively, brake gradually so you don't engage the disk brakes, or use ECO mode.

Nice to see another LEAF in Oxfordshire. What colour do you have?
I mainly commute on the A34 to Didcot and back, I'll look out for you! :)
 

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it ignores the fact that people learn how to adapt to a diesel vs petrol, and the way to drive an automatic after driving a manual :)
Agreed, and the changes to driving style are largely those which are taught to learner drivers these days anyhow - looking ahead, gradual acceleration, gradual coasting rather than braking.
 

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EVs are probably the easiest to drive of all vehicles.

I was just thinking (again) today on my dash across Milton Keynes, it's really simple and "how it should be". It's nothing like "automatic" and for me you can forget about the whole "better driver" because you "drive stick" or whatever, sure I can drive a manual, I've been on the track several times, I know how to "drive", but EVs for me are almost the ultimate "pure" driving experience.

I point the car where I want it to, I press the go faster pedal, and I'm off! Simple!
 
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