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I currently run a 07 2.2 diesel Civic which has now got 180K miles on it (25K a year), the car has been faultless and is still driving like a dream. I commute 86 motorway miles a day at 60MPH and easily achieve 64MPG out of it.. I would love to get into an EV but I am concerned about the longevity of these cars.
Would a mainstream EV such as Ioniq, e208 or a Leaf etc be capable of doing 200K miles of worry free motoring over 8 years or so?
I wouldn't want to spend mega bucks, £25k at the most.
Has anyone done some interstellar miles in an EV could that share their experience?

P.S. i'll be driving the Civic until it dies, the longer the better in the hope that EV prices start coming down.

Thanks
 

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Corsa-e 2020
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Many less moving parts to wear out in an EV. Less wear and tear. I have no idea what your fuel costs are at the moment but if you were in, for example, a Corsa-e or e-208, you would be getting around 3.8 miles/kWh at 60mph on the motorway. With your 86 mile commute and assuming you were on an EV tariff for your electricity such as Octopus Go Faster for 5 hours a night at 5.5p/kWh, your fuel costs would be about £1.25/day. That together with the lower maintenance costs and no VED should be taken into accoiunt.

Assuming you were to charge your car up to around 80%-90% each day, you'd have no problems. You could charge up to 100% if you wanted but I find the efficiency is better if you have some regen braking available and on the Corsa-e/e-208 you don't have that above 95%.

Thing is, your Honda Civic probably has about another 100k miles left in it so by the time you want to change, the market will be different from what it is now. The savings, however, may be enough to persuade you to make the change to the dark side now.
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona 64kWh in very bright Acid Yellow :)
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You can just about get a second hand Kona 64kWh for £25k with a range of 250-300 miles. I don't see any reason why it couldn't do 200K miles of trouble free motoring...... They have a 5 year warranty from new, so even a 2 year old one would have 3 years of warranty left. Just check for recalls, especially the ones for the main traction battery.
If you only require 86 miles, you could always get a Leaf 40kWh for around £15k and just run it until it drops with £10k in your pocket ready towards a newer EV in 4-5 years time?
 

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EVs are still coming down in price, and improving fast, so I'd be tempted to run the diesel until it breaks. It can't have much trade-in value surely, maybe £500?

But if you want to swap, I'd suggest a Hyundai Ioniq 28 kWh, 2nd hand are about £13k upwards, the battery is air cooled (done properly, unlike Leaf Mk1) so no costly fluid-change the EV mfrs like to throw at us. It's about the most efficient EV out there, thanks to good aerodynamics unlike the Kona/Niro/SUV shapes. It will do that commute easily in winter, and the low price leaves you plenty of cash in hand just-in-case. It charges very quickly at around 65 kW. They seem to do very high mileages wih minimal battery degradation. See ioniqforum.com for tons more info & opinions.
 

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Many less moving parts to wear out in an EV. Less wear and tear. I have no idea what your fuel costs are at the moment but if you were in, for example, a Corsa-e or e-208, you would be getting around 3.8 miles/kWh at 60mph on the motorway. With your 86 mile commute and assuming you were on an EV tariff for your electricity such as Octopus Go Faster for 5 hours a night at 5.5p/kWh, your fuel costs would be about £1.25/day. That together with the lower maintenance costs and no VED should be taken into accoiunt.

Assuming you were to charge your car up to around 80%-90% each day, you'd have no problems. You could charge up to 100% if you wanted but I find the efficiency is better if you have some regen braking available and on the Corsa-e/e-208 you don't have that above 95%.

Thing is, your Honda Civic probably has about another 100k miles left in it so by the time you want to change, the market will be different from what it is now. The savings, however, may be enough to persuade you to make the change to the dark side now.
The many moving parts of the Honda Civic are obviously very well lubricated, judging by your experience to date. Just because something moves, doesnt mean per se it will wear out. Conversely static components in EVs, eg capacitors can cause failures (possible very expensive to diagnose and fix).

Probably, because your Honda Civic will have zero depreciation cost and presumably zero financing cost, the cheapest option will be to retain and use until there is a failure that is too expensive to repair. The biggest spanner in the spokes of that approach, will be the likely widespread adoption post pandemic, of LEZs in most cities, making use of an older diesel illegal for many journeys.
 

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Suggest you have a play with abetterrouteplanner.com and stick in your choice of EV. Try Leaf 40, Ioniq 28, select your motorway speed & see what it comes up with. Try it with winter settings, low temp & a headwind & wet.

Ioniq 38 will absolutely eat that trip, but they're a bit pricier, the early ones, 2019 & 2020s are having battery recalls, which means the charging's limited to 90& SOC max, and probably better to stick to 80% max, and not fully discharge etc, so there's a bit of uncertainty with these. Plus a costly fluid change at year 4! So unless you want to do say 150 miles in winter non-stop, there's no great advantage over the 28s.

Ioniqs don't suffer massive drop-off in range when going over 60 mph, as Leafs seem to do - again it's down to aerodynamics, v poor on Leaf. You may find the Ioniq 28 has a better range than Leaf 40 at fast motorway cruising speed!
 

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The many moving parts of the Honda Civic are obviously very well lubricated, judging by your experience to date. Just because something moves, doesnt mean per se it will wear out. Conversely static components in EVs, eg capacitors can cause failures (possible very expensive to diagnose and fix).

Probably, because your Honda Civic will have zero depreciation cost and presumably zero financing cost, the cheapest option will be to retain and use until there is a failure that is too expensive to repair. The biggest spanner in the spokes of that approach, will be the likely widespread adoption post pandemic, of LEZs in most cities, making use of an older diesel illegal for many journeys.
A lot of LEZs will be based around Euro 6 Diesels, approximately post September 2015. However my money is on moving goalposts.
 

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NISSAN LEAF 62Kwh
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The simple truth is if you are looking to run an EV over 8 years, then you need to allow for battery degradation. Expect to have lost 30% of the battery capacity at 8 years, worst case scenario, if it's better than that, then happy days.

An EV with a small battery capacity is okay for the first 4 years, then with battery degradation, it becomes questionable if it will make the required range in the depths of winter, without having to stop for a charge mid trip.

The only answer, really is to go for largest battery capacity you can afford, probably nothing less than 55Kwh available capacity, new.

The battery apart, an EV is just the same as any other vehicle - if it's from a decent manufacturer and is properly maintained, then there is no reason why it shouldn't match or even exceed the mileages of conventional vehicle.
The electric motor is just as reliable as modern internal combustion engines.

As others have mentioned, on 25K miles PA mileage there is a potential to save at least £2K PA in fuel, plus EV's are much quieter and smoother to drive, especially important when spending a sizable chunk of time commuting.
 

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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EVs are not for everyone. I suspect Honda Civic diesel owners will be very reluctant to make that momentous change.
 

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MG ZS EV
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There are some interesting stories that come out of California where a taxi firm uses Teslas for airport runs... that is San Diego to LAX and Palm Springs to LAX. They had a variety of ages of cars and were over 300.000 miles on some. Battery life seemed to be serendipity some failed early others were past 300,000 with little degredation even in the heat. No major failures from the motors; tires (sic) were a big expense and paint was losing its gloss with the sand blasting on the way to Palm Springs. The Pilots seats were showing wear but not the passengers. I think it reasonable to expect the simple drive trains to stand up and there are Leafs and MG ZSs being used as taxis in the UK and no horror stories?
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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From a basic engineering point of view EVs drive trains should outlast any internal combustion engine. The issue is whether design, build and materials quality matches the Honda. They and Toyota build absolute cockroach cars that just keep going, often in the face of real neglect. Their engines are marvels to be honest. After batteries I suspect the sort of failures we might see are power electronics. again there’s no reason for these to be unreliable, it all depends how well designed and manufactured they are.

Given we’re seeing fairly early Tesla’s, which sometimes seem to be held together with chewing gum and gaffer tape, doing big miles without surprising major failures, the other brands really should be able to match that. But time will tell.

One interesting point about the Tesla fleets is that even when they have expensive repairs, overall they’re still cheaper to run by a significant margin. The 300k mile Tesla also still has value when retired.
 

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From a basic engineering point of view EVs drive trains should outlast any internal combustion engine. The issue is whether design, build and materials quality matches the Honda. They and Toyota build absolute cockroach cars that just keep going, often in the face of real neglect. Their engines are marvels to be honest. After batteries I suspect the sort of failures we might see are power electronics. again there’s no reason for these to be unreliable, it all depends how well designed and manufactured they are.

Given we’re seeing fairly early Tesla’s, which sometimes seem to be held together with chewing gum and gaffer tape, doing big miles without surprising major failures, the other brands really should be able to match that. But time will tell.

One interesting point about the Tesla fleets is that even when they have expensive repairs, overall they’re still cheaper to run by a significant margin. The 300k mile Tesla also still has value when retired.
No, not necessarily the case that newer technology outlasts older. Often the older technology is significantly more repairable and so can outlive the newer. The assertion that electric drivetrains will outlive ICE drivetrains is just frankly a bit of hot air that doesn't stand close examination. It will of course be true in some specific cases: this doesn't make it a universal truth.
 

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Can you charge at the office? Can you charge at home?
If so, I would not spend the 25k, but buy a cheap 5k Nissan Leaf 24 or 30.
You will start saving from the next day and it will still be a huge step up from a 2007 Civic.

If you can only charge at home, I would look for a Nissan Leaf 40 at 15k or anything similar with the range.
You can also save the 10k and fill the range gap of a Leaf 24 and Leaf 30 with a free or cheap fast charge on your way home. In summer, the Leaf 30 will not even need it, and those 10k are well worth your 15 minutes a day sitting at the charger browsing on your smartphone.
 

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2020 VW ID3 Life 58kWh
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Been said already but the classic Ioniq 28kWh would be great for your commute they seem well built and owners report very little battery degradation.

Leafs are a little bit of a mixed bag 2015 onwards 24kWh Leafs batteries seem to hold up well, 30kWh ones seem to degrade faster but it's probably still too early to know for sure.

40kWh Leafs are too new to know what the battery degradation will be like but I've seen a few examples on YouTube where the battery pack has actually physically buckled and warped due to heat build up I would imagine this was due to a lot of rapid charging but id suspect normal use would show heavy degradation compared to an actively cooled battery pack.

MG ZS EVs and the MG5 are coming down in price now the cars seems good enough but I'm not sure about the company itself and after sales support, probably depends a lot on your local dealership that.

An eGolf with the 35kWH battery might also be a contender most owners seem to really like them and the depreciation is low, not much of an issue if your keeping it for years though.

40kWh Zoe would also do the journey and it's probably the most reliable Renault but that's not saying much is it :ROFLMAO:
 

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Zoe GT Line 2020
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I had a 2012 Civic 2.2 Diesel until last autumn when I bought a Zoe 50, and a 2007 one before that. Great cars, and there's lots of features I miss, but neither model was exempt from the London ULEZ, and working in Brighton there's a good chance something similar could end up being introduced there. I never got great mpg from them though, but that's probably my heavy right foot.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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I think Andy's point is a good one. The cost of running such a car is going to increase and you may find there start being places that simply won't allow it at all. After driving diesels for years I'm one of the people who realised I just couldn't drive one any more in all good conscience. Perhaps on the motorway but certainly not in a city.

Notwithstanding an expensive repair you don't want to make e.g. clutch, the Civic is probably going to be legislated off the road before it dies.

It's definitely worth running the numbers. Know how much fuel costs and what impact price rises are, factor in realistic maintenance and what it's likely to need in the foreseeable future. Might the distances you cover change etc etc. When I did all this it was clear the EV, while more expensive, wasn't anywhere near as much more as I first thought... and that's mainly because I've tended to run cheap cars.
 

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ZE40 R110
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Run the Civic until is uneconomic to do so then buy an EV, Honda's are notorious for lasting forever so you will be able to pick up a cheap £20K EV in the future that will do 240 miles in the depths of winter at motorway speeds and charge back up again in 15 min.
 
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