Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

Would cheap petrol make you think twice about EV next time you change car ?

  • Definitely

  • Would get that spreadsheet out and double check

  • Only if I really have to be careful about my cost per mile

  • No, cheaper fuel is not the main attraction for me

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
SU-EV convert
Jaguar iPace 2020
Joined
·
338 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which crude going lower, there is a remote possibility that the price of petrol at the pump goes down somewhat. If that were to happen, would EV lose some of their shine in your eyes ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
I can't see fuel getting anywhere near as low as electricity from home. As that is not an option I selected put it in a speadsheet to check - but in actual fact the spreadsheet would be done in my head and I already know what the answer would be
 

·
http://ts.la/david3488
Joined
·
642 Posts
As I drove past a petrol station in my leaf this morning I shuddered at the thought of when the PHEV arrives next week I will have to put petrol in a car, something I haven't done for a year lol.
Still at least the BEV will make be feel a bit better, seriously though I pray for fuel strikes and fuel price hikes :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
It's encouraging that for most of us here cheaper fuel isn't the main issue. We are however "early adopters" and probably not representative of most motorists. There is now a likihood of significantly cheaper petrol for next few years which will delay the transition to EVs for the majority of motorists. This will also have impacts on politicians and car manufacturers so possibly less sympathy for EV infrastructure development or new EV models.
The "inevitable" transition may lose a bit of its urgency but one way forward may be increased EV use through PHEVs which seem to be more acceptable to the average motorist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,097 Posts
Not only will EV, windpower and alternative fuel development be disadvantaged as a result; in its impact on the wider economy it also means giving another kick to deflation. Pretty much the only political benefit is the degree to which it puts more pressure on Putin...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,952 Posts
As I drove past a petrol station in my leaf this morning I shuddered at the thought of when the PHEV arrives next week I will have to put petrol in a car, something I haven't done for a year lol.
Still at least the BEV will make be feel a bit better, seriously though I pray for fuel strikes and fuel price hikes :)
@Dave Davies don't worry about putting petrol into your PHEV, what you will worry about is a greater range anxiety than you ever had in your BEV as you watch the range meter dropping to one mile when you have two miles to go!
Just watch how slow you drive as it becomes more than a game to ensure the ICE doesn't kick in. :p
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dave Davies

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,952 Posts
I never did that with my Ampera. For me the benefit of having a PHEV is that you don't have to do all that... you can just drive it like a ICE.
No, I sold an ICE to get away from petrol.
The benefit of the Ampera along with other PHEV's is the fact that you dont need to fill it up but have the option of an ICE where and when it is required. Two cars in one.
BEV owners will criticise PHEV owners for constantly dragging an engine around with them but I have noted just how efficient the Volt/Ampera is getting up to 50 miles from 10kWh. that is 200Wh per mile and better than either of my other BEV's and possibly better than early Leaf's.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robwiz

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,249 Posts
I have noted just how efficient the Volt/Ampera is getting up to 50 miles from 10kWh. that is 200Wh per mile and better than either of my other BEV's and possibly better than early Leaf's.
LOL! I very rarely got more than 40 miles from the Ampera battery. It is possible but only in exceptional conditions or when driving slowly.

There are two types of PHEV owner IMO...

1) Those that really would prefer a BEV but don't like the idea of running out (in other words they want the safety net)

2) Those that might want a BEV but don't like the idea of constantly stopping to charge and just want to drive in the same way they do now with the ICE.

Anyone can be both but most people would identify more with one or the other.

People of the first type will drive their PHEV like it was a BEV, perhaps stopping to charge at public chargers, drive in an eco manner and resent using petrol.

People of the 2nd type consider the stops a bore and/or inconvenient. This type will just drive their PHEV in the same way they drive their ICE not worrying about using petrol when they need to but with the benefit of being able to charge up at home/work etc.

I was type 1 but changed more to type 2 once I realised the degree of inconvenience I often had to endure. I realise that for you it may not be an inconvenience but it is for me :)

Early adopters, like most of the owners of today, are probably more towards type 1 than 2. As time goes on and more and more people with no interest in EVs buy so they will just want a car to get them from A to B without fuss so we will get more owners of type 2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,952 Posts
@Paul_Churchley
I am the third type. Need a workhorse and hated filling up my ICE car of many years even though I have two BEV's to choose from.
Can't stand the Prius design and the Volt/Ampera still has the greatest electric only range.
Regarding 50 mile range, I was surprised how easy I reached 48 miles one hot day which surprisingly included some traffic light drag races through the city. 30 mph speed limits obviously helping but kicking myself for not reaching the half ton.

You may have changed to type 2 but I note you were converted to BEV eventually.;)
 

·
http://ts.la/david3488
Joined
·
642 Posts
The only reason im buying a phev as well is because I cant get a BEV that is big with a decent trim.
As soon as I can the PHEV is out the door
 
  • Like
Reactions: Russ

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
Interesting that the weight of response saying that fuel cost is not the main consideration doesn't quite square with the level of undercollar warmth regarding public charging costs elsewhere on the forum
 

·
SU-EV convert
Jaguar iPace 2020
Joined
·
338 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Interesting that the weight of response saying that fuel cost is not the main consideration doesn't quite square with the level of undercollar warmth regarding public charging costs elsewhere on the forum
Although it's not the main consideration, nobody likes getting the impression of being taken for a ride on pricing....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,249 Posts
Need a workhorse and hated filling up my ICE car of many years even though I have two BEV's
Type 1 then :)

You may have changed to type 2 but I note you were converted to BEV eventually
Not so mon capitan... I started with a Nissan Leaf in April 2011. So I started very much a type 1 with a BEV. Then I was seduced by the Ampera and traded my ICE for an Ampera. Started out a type 1 and gradually, as I realised more and more that I didn't want the inconvenience of stopping to charge, I became a type 2. I became so much a type 2 that having the Ampera made little sense for long trips so much so in fact that I have now traded the Ampera for a Qashqai which I use for long trips as it uses less petrol/diesel than the Ampera (even allowing for an initial 40 miles on battery). I am now firmly a type 2.

The only reason im buying a phev as well is because I cant get a BEV that is big with a decent trim
Type 1 then :)

Interesting that the weight of response saying that fuel cost is not the main consideration doesn't quite square with the level of undercollar warmth regarding public charging costs elsewhere on the forum
I don't see any connection between the two until they converge... either by the EV charging getting so expensive it approaches the cost of petrol or by the cost of petrol dropping so much it approaches the cost of EV charging. While they are so far apart opinions on one are not likely to be related to opinions on the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
Although it's not the main consideration, nobody likes getting the impression of being taken for a ride on pricing....
It was more "why answer with option 4 here rather than option 3", not questioning whether people really are put out by the charging prices out there. Loud and clear on that score.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EV:mk

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,347 Posts
[QUOTE="Paul_Churchley, post: 65264, member: 50"There are two types of PHEV owner IMO...

1) Those that really would prefer a BEV but don't like the idea of running out (in other words they want the safety net)

2) Those that might want a BEV but don't like the idea of constantly stopping to charge and just want to drive in the same way they do now with the ICE.[/QUOTE]

I think there's also a type 3 – someone who doesn't give a stuff about the environment, emissions or EV technology but loves to reduce his tax burden. Low emissions vehicles are the latest fiscal opportunity for him (and it always is a male).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
[QUOTE="Paul_Churchley, post: 65264, member: 50"There are two types of PHEV owner IMO...

1) Those that really would prefer a BEV but don't like the idea of running out (in other words they want the safety net)

2) Those that might want a BEV but don't like the idea of constantly stopping to charge and just want to drive in the same way they do now with the ICE.

I think there's also a type 3 – someone who doesn't give a stuff about the environment, emissions or EV technology but loves to reduce his tax burden. Low emissions vehicles are the latest fiscal opportunity for him (and it always is a male).
[/QUOTE]
Ok then I'm type 1 when driving locally, type 2 when driving long distance, definitely not type Type 3 but type 4 when it's snowing , type 5 when I need to carry or tow something, Type 6 when I need a decent view or sunshine through the roof type 7 when off roading & so on ad nauseum
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top