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Has anyone else noticed that Zap-Map is becoming increasingly out of date? I've reported a couple of new chargers nearby in recent months but they've not appeared on the map and I wonder whether this is common across the country?

The worst feature of my KIA e-niro is without doubt the sat nav and its list of charging points. It was completely out of date when I took delivery of the car last June. I wouldn't rely on it to find charging points and now I'm wondering how much I can rely on Zap-Map to direct me to the nearest charging points.

Until EV charging stations are as ubiquitous as petrol stations, we really need accurate, up to date information to find these essential resources. 🤷‍♂️
 

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Has anyone else noticed that Zap-Map is becoming increasingly out of date? I've reported a couple of new chargers nearby in recent months but they've not appeared on the map and I wonder whether this is common across the country?
When they get data from the networks or the central registry they add them pretty quickly. However I've previously used the "add a chargepoint" function and not heard anything back, however a random comment on a nearby chargepoint about the new ones has been picked up and they've been added. I wonder if the "add a chargepoint" option actually works.
 

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Last time I looked at zap map I couldn't make out the map / locations as they were hidden by all the charge points! It looks very cluttered until you zoom right in
 

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I wonder if the "add a chargepoint" option actually works.
They added the new charge point at J27 on the M6 when I reported it that way, and replied thanking me for the info. I did refer them to the thread on it on SpeakEV.
 

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I've added about 6-7 charge points over the last two years, but did notice that last one last September took about three weeks or so, so to answer your original question, Yes they probably are very busy at the moment. Still the best app for checking whether a charger actually works or not from the user comments so I'm quite happy to use it.

My favorite sport is dropping in at Killington Lake on M6 South Bound yesterday that is always reported as faulty. I had a few issues with the first Ecotricity charger struggling to communicate with the Zoe although strangely it started charging when I open the car door. But the 2nd charger worked well and now Zap map shows that charger working again, I wonder how long it will take for another user to report it as faulty because it only delivers 11Kwh instead of 44Kwh on their Tesla M3 :)
 

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Sorry to reanimate this thread after several months, but it seemed appropriate.

I am sure that Zap-Map was an excellent tool during the first decade of EVs in the UK. Drivers then were generally early adopters, knew what they are doing, and if they didn't, the community looked after them.

Ranges were shorter too, so a tool like this was crucial to find chargers locations, and whether they were in service.

We are now at that tipping point of mass market breakthrough, and the motor trade is sending EV newbies out into the world with a terrifyingly low amount of knowledge.

So of course they get confused, misunderstand things, and cause problems. And most crucially, they mark perfectly functional chargers unavailable.

It astonishes me that there is no reliable way to feedback on this. The owners don't ever contribute on the chat channels in response to feedback.

Conversely, some of the shoddier networks feeds report chargers completely functional that aren't, and have been reported as such, sometimes with detail on the specific failures.

Zap-Map are a well known brand in this space. I don't know whether the brand has been sold to new owners, but they don't seem bothered about being seen as reliable, or trustworthy.

It's a real shame as a single pane view of charger status is something the industry needs. So far it seems a long way off.
 

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Sorry to reanimate this thread after several months, but it seemed appropriate.

I am sure that Zap-Map was an excellent tool during the first decade of EVs in the UK. Drivers then were generally early adopters, knew what they are doing, and if they didn't, the community looked after them.

Ranges were shorter too, so a tool like this was crucial to find chargers locations, and whether they were in service.

We are now at that tipping point of mass market breakthrough, and the motor trade is sending EV newbies out into the world with a terrifyingly low amount of knowledge.

So of course they get confused, misunderstand things, and cause problems. And most crucially, they mark perfectly functional chargers unavailable.

It astonishes me that there is no reliable way to feedback on this. The owners don't ever contribute on the chat channels in response to feedback.

Conversely, some of the shoddier networks feeds report chargers completely functional that aren't, and have been reported as such, sometimes with detail on the specific failures.

Zap-Map are a well known brand in this space. I don't know whether the brand has been sold to new owners, but they don't seem bothered about being seen as reliable, or trustworthy.

It's a real shame as a single pane view of charger status is something the industry needs. So far it seems a long way off.
As ever, we all seem to expect to be offered a perfect on- line service for free.

I've not been around the EV scene as long as some in here, but I remember Zapmap as being operated originally as a voluntary service by someone who saw the need and asked users to provide the information. As opposed to the charge point operators who have generally been unreliable.

Nowadays it must be a huge job to operate Zapmap and I see some attempts to commercialise it. I can't see those raising much really.

Personally I would be prepared to pay a modest membership fee for the use of such independent relatively comprehensive information all in one place. Flaws and all!
 

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Basically agree with the above. It’s free crowd sourced data. Take it for what it is.

I think the real solution to all of this is down to the reliability of the providers. As far as I am aware there isn’t a huge call for an app that shows where petrol pumps are free/unoccupied/broke. Etc. Nor should there be for chargers.

Providers need to mature to the point it’s a given things work and they all provide online data about there current usage (I’m talking to you Shell!) A crowd sourced app should not be necessary.
 

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Crowdsourced data will still have a value for a while even after networks become more reliable for those who use locally-managed destination chargers. Over time hotels and tourist sites etc will no doubt get bored of maintaining these and will shift to a managed model with one of the networks but until then the Wild West of charging will be with us for a few more years.

Whether zap map is sustainable, I’m not so sure - their recent decision to charge huge subscriptions for new features feels like a ‘jump the shark’ moment and probably illustrates that they can’t monetise their data (user or charge point). Once Apple and Google maps take major network charge point integration seriously I think Zap map will be dead in the water, leaving PlugShare or similar to cover the random chargers hidden up mountains etc
 

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As far as I am aware there isn’t a huge call for an app that shows where petrol pumps are free/unoccupied/broke. Etc. Nor should there be for chargers.
It's not a fair comparison yet. There's enormously more petrol stations than charging locations!
Reliability should and will improve, I'm sure, but another thing that will help will be the existence of large sites with multiple chargers, like Tesla had right from the start. You don't need to know in advance that two of the chargers are faulty if there's 8 of them at the same site.
And there needs to be enough of those so there's one reasonably near you wherever you are.
 

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There's enormously more petrol stations than charging locations!
We're getting to the point where that is debatable. Certainly the word "enormously".

Sticking to locations with rapid chargers to start with, there are 3,008, and rising rapidly, locations with rapid chargers in the UK (www.zap-map.com/statistics/) and 8,380, and falling, petrol stations (www.statista.com).

However, including destination chargers there are 15,825 public charging locations (Zap-Map statistics again), which is far more than the number of petrol stations.

And if you were to include home chargers ...

Note: interestingly, official UK statistics quote Zap-Map! (Electric vehicle charging device statistics: April 2021)
 

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It's not a fair comparison yet. There's enormously more petrol stations than charging locations!
Reliability should and will improve, I'm sure, but another thing that will help will be the existence of large sites with multiple chargers, like Tesla had right from the start. You don't need to know in advance that two of the chargers are faulty if there's 8 of them at the same site.
And there needs to be enough of those so there's one reasonably near you wherever you are.
Be careful of made up statistics. Did you know that 68.35% of all statistics are made up on the spot? A little bit of digging may surprise you.

Currently, in the UK, there are approximately 8,340 petrol/diesel stations. I do not know the actual number of individual pumps but you have a baseline here to start your “statistical” journey.

According to the latest stats from ZapMap, there are 3008 rapid charging location with 4,667 “devices” providing 10,753 connectors. 177 new devices installed in the last 30 days which equates to 362 new connectors. This is just Rapid chargers.

At the end of May 2021, there were approximately 280,000 BEVs registered in the UK. There are slightly more PHEVs but I won’t count them in the stats as they are blasphemous heathens amongst the pure BEV Illuminati and they will go the same way as the ICE luddites eventual downfall.

As of the end of June 2021, EV sales were up 162% year on year with 2020. The steepening curve looks like the start of a new “wave” on a pandemic infections graph. The same goes for charging locations.

The total number of public charging devices including “destination” chargers is just under 25,000. So, taking into account the number of ICE fuelling stations (8,340), just plucking a figure out of the air (just like most peoples ‘statistics’) of say, an average of 4 pumps per filling station with 2 “connectors” per pump, that gives approximately 67,000 “connectors” for ICE cars compared to 10,753 Rapid “connectors” for BEV cars.

Consider those numbers for a minute… there are over 32 million cars registered in the UK. BEVs are still a small fraction of those numbers, less than 1%. Even if you want to include PHEVs, it’s still less than 1.5% of all cars currently. Now compare he number of Rapid charging connectors to petrol pump connectors, even if my assumption of the number of petrol/diesel pumps per forecourt is doubled, that’s 10,753:134,000. Even with my O level maths, I can see that the proportion of “refuelling connectors” is higher for EVs than it is for ICE cars.

It will never be easy to do precise comparisons as it’s like comparing apples and oranges and I haven’t really taken into account all the destination and home chargers. For most BEV drivers, “filling up” at a forecourt is not going to be a regular event as it was when they were ICE car drivers. The vast majority will be ”filling up” at home or work or wherever they park. As 2035 looms, those numbers are all going to change but for now, quoting “There's enormously more petrol stations than charging locations!” is not realy accurate, is it?

My two sources for the above data are:



Edited to add: someone has already done most of the above here:

 

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Be careful of made up statistics.
Thank you for a well researched reply. I didn't quote (or make up) actual figures, but I did make a comparison, which your numbers show to be technically incorrect.

However I think there is a very different perception about petrol stations vs. chargers, whatever the numbers say.
In my ICE days, if I was getting a bit low on fuel, I simply carried on driving while looking out for a petrol station and expected to find one on my route before I ran out. Only rarely, if desperate, would I get the satnav to find a nearby petrol station.
If you drive an EV in an area you don't know, you are unlikely to find a charger that way. Apart from motorways where you know there is one in every service area, they are typically hidden away in car parks and not well advertised.
That's another reason why they should be installed in much larger numbers per site, which was the real point of my earlier post. And there should be a big sign and canopy with the brand name on it clearly visible from the road, like most petrol stations have. Fastned do this well, for example. Not only would it make life easier for EV drivers, but it would help those that haven't taken that step yet to see that there are obvious places where they could charge their EV if they were to get one.
 

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Thank you for a well researched reply. I didn't quote (or make up) actual figures, but I did make a comparison, which your numbers show to be technically incorrect.

However I think there is a very different perception about petrol stations vs. chargers, whatever the numbers say.
In my ICE days, if I was getting a bit low on fuel, I simply carried on driving while looking out for a petrol station and expected to will find one on my route before I ran out. Only rarely, if desperate, would I get the satnav to find a nearby petrol station.
If you drive an EV in an area you don't know, you are unlikely to find a charger that way. Apart from motorways where you know there is one in every service area, they are typically hidden away in car parks and not well advertised.
That's another reason why they should be installed in much larger numbers per site, which was the real point of my earlier post. And there should be a big sign and canopy with the brand name on it clearly visible from the road, like most petrol stations have. Fastned do this well, for example. Not only would it make life easier for EV drivers, but it would help those that haven't taken that step yet to see that there are obvious places where they could charge their EV if they were to get one.
Back in my workaholic days I found myself in Cambridge, which I knew well by day, at midnight with an empty tank outside the petrol station that I normally used but it was closed.

Phoned the AA (no idea Guv, we're in Birmingham) who suggested the local police. Perfect turn by turn instructions to the nearest 24hour petrol station.

I wonder how you'd get on asking them for directions the nearest CCS charger today.
 

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However I think there is a very different perception about petrol stations vs. chargers, whatever the numbers say.
In my ICE days, if I was getting a bit low on fuel, I simply carried on driving while looking out for a petrol station and expected to will find one on my route before I ran out. Only rarely, if desperate, would I get the satnav to find a nearby petrol station.
If you drive an EV in an area you don't know, you are unlikely to find a charger that way. Apart from motorways where you know there is one in every service area, they are typically hidden away in car parks and not well advertised.
That's another reason why they should be installed in much larger numbers per site, which was the real point of my earlier post. And there should be a big sign and canopy with the brand name on it clearly visible from the road, like most petrol stations have. Fastned do this well, for example. Not only would it make life easier for EV drivers, but it would help those that haven't taken that step yet to see that there are obvious places where they could charge their EV if they were to get one.
I think as EV adoption ramps up, we will see an evolution in petrol stations. As I mentioned in my little essay, it's not comparing like with like. Many drivers who now regularly visit petrol forecourts will do so less and less. However, there will still be a need to cater for the 1/3 of the population that doesn't have off-street parking. Again, many of those will probably, eventually, have much better access to destination charging on the street or dedicated parking spaces.

There will also be increasing numbers of EV drivers who will be driving beyond the range of the battery of their car, whether for work or leisure and they, together with the commercial vans and lorries will be the main users of forecourts for recharging. The dynamics are different and so the layouts will have to be modified. If you've been to Gridserve at Braintree, you'll already see the requirements. Longer stopping times is an opportunity for the vendors to make extra profits with cafes/restaurants and even shops.

The only places that will remain with just one or two units will be the typical rural type of current petrol station that has maybe 2 pumps with 4 connections. Many places like McDonalds and other fast food places will become the mini forecourts of the future. As long as we don't lag behind with single units hidden in remote corners of desolate car parks, we'll be OK. For now, the infrastructure is changing at a fair pace but there's a danger that the rate of uptake of BEVs will outstrip the rate at which new rapid charging locations and connections are being installed.
 

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The only thing to add when comparing the number of pumps to chargers , is the charge time. It only take 5 mins to charge an ICE car and 30 mins + to charge BEV. This makes a direct comparison much more difficult ,coupled with the fact most BEV's can start a journey on a full tank, where an ICE car is dependent on the fuel pump.

Again I agree with the above comments once the number of charger locations increase and we "know" where are chargers are likely to be , Supermarkets , fast food outlets , Services , etc . We wont need to plan long journeys like an expedition up the Amazon. Hopefully before 2030 :)
 
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